Right Light is a project founded and funded by Enactus Southampton at the University of Southampton. It has been successful in Madagascar and Kenya before and JEEP has partnered with Enactus to implement the scheme in rural Uganda in January 2013.

Right Light aims at spreading the use of solar lamps within Ugandan communities. After getting to know the targeted villages and giving out testing lamps, JEEP provides a chosen resident with financial and technical training to become a local entrepreneur for their village, running a solar lamp renting/selling business. After paying off their lamps at a rate of 20% of their income, the entrepreneurs will be completely independent, by then making their own strategic and financial decisions.

TRAction project is aimed at developing, testing and evaluating state of the art behavior change interventions to improve the acquisition and correct use of a locally fabricated mwoto stove in Uganda. This project is funded by USAID through University Research Corporation (URC).

 

It is implemented by Program for Appropriate Technologies in Health (PATH), Joint Energy And Environment Projects (JEEP) and Center for Research in Energy and Energy Conservation (CREEC). The TRAction project will integrate behaviour change interventions including a direct sale model.

Access to electricity in Uganda is limited for most of the population. The Ugandan census of 2002 reported that 7.7% of households used electricity for lighting (37% of urban households and 2.6% of rural households) this was up from 5.6% in 1991. In contrast, 74.8% of households (33.3% of urban and 88.2% of rural) were using “tadooba”, a form of paraffin candle, for lighting

Forests and woodlands are estimated to have covered about 10,800,000 ha (45%) of Uganda’s surface area in around 1890. Since then the size of the forest estate has drastically shrunk. Over the years the forests have been gradually cleared and today estimates indicate reduction to about 730,000 ha which is only (3%) of Uganda’s area

Access to electricity in Uganda is limited for most of the population. The Ugandan census of 2002 reported that 7.7% of households used electricity for lighting (37% of urban households and 2.6% of rural households) this was up from 5.6% in 1991. In contrast, 74.8% of households (33.3% of urban and 88.2% of rural) were using “tadooba”, a form of paraffin candle, for lighting

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